Victorian Greens to introduce bill to ban battery cages and sow stalls and clarify meaning of 'free range'

The Victorian Greens will introduce a bill into state parliament this week to ban battery cages and sow stalls, clarify the meaning of ‘free range’ and to ban the routine debeaking of hens. Greens animal welfare spokesperson, Sue Pennicuik, who will introduce the bill, said that "present laws are failing farm animals which are subject to cruel and unnecessary practices".

"Research shows that 83% of Australians support or strongly support laws to ensure that animals bred for human consumption have access to the outdoors, companions, natural materials and enough space to carry out their instinctive behaviour".

Legislative program

03/09/2014

Ms PENNICUIK (Southern Metropolitan) -- Last night the Council sat late debating a controversial bill which has raised huge concerns in the community. Like many pieces of legislation introduced during this parliamentary term, that bill is not based on any public inquiry, report or evidence and has received very little scrutiny. There are 25 bills in the lower house and 12 in the upper house with less than three sitting weeks remaining. Many of these bills are similar to the one debated late last night in that they are based not on any evidence but rather on populism. In its media release of 20 August, the Law Institute of Victoria said it is:

... deeply concerned about the raft of 'law and order' measures the state government is rushing to introduce before the November state election.

Jumps Racing petition

03/09/2014

Ms PENNICUIK (Southern Metropolitan) -- I move:

That this house takes note of the petition bearing 532 signatures from certain citizens of Victoria requesting that the Legislative Council of Victoria call on the Minister for Racing to intervene and end steeplechase and hurdle racing in Victoria tabled in the house on 5 August 2014.

Member's Statement: Christopher Mardon

20/08/2014

Ms PENNICUIK (Southern Metropolitan) -- Christopher Jack Mardon was a quiet man of great intelligence who involved himself in serious issues throughout his life, such as the promotion of a green economy and the science of global warming. Chris was a past president of the Conservation Council of Victoria and co-author of the seminal book Seeds for Change, published in 1978. Its model for an alternative, lower energy Melbourne has been described as an 'exciting blueprint for livable cities'.
Chris lived in Japan for seven years and taught English at the Osaka University of Foreign Studies. He was an engineer and scientist and worked for the CSIRO for more than 20 years. After retiring Chris continued to follow a wide range of issues very closely and to disseminate detailed analyses to his wide network of contacts.